How To Know When To Cancel A Web Hosting Plan

How To Know When To Cancel A Web Hosting Plan

There may come a time when you have no choice but to cancel your web hosting plan. Some people can get stuck in a situation where they are tolerating a bad web hosting situation with the hope that it will improve, and never quite know when enough is enough. Unfortunately, there are still shady businesses out there. If you have been receiving bad service for a while, and you have given your host ample amount of time to correct it to no avail, then it’s time to move on to a new host.
Here are a couple of the most common problems that, if they are persistent for long enough, may justify you leaving your old hosting provider for a new one.
Bad Customer Service
The biggest and most common one is just downright lousy customer service. Most of the web hosting companies today offer 24/7 customer service of some kind, including phone service, live chat or just basic email service. If you have a problem with your host and have tried all three methods to solve it, and nothing has come of it. Then it’s time to switch. Bad phone service usually starts with being put on hold for long periods of time. Then after you manage to get on, you are directed to a machine responder and told to leave your information and a representative will get back to you, which of course they never do. Then you call again a few days later, and after finally getting a human on the other end of the line, you find out that they are not able to solve your problem. This type of thing can go on and on with some of the smaller, unreliable companies out there. They just may not be equipped to handle some of the technical problems that come up. Then you really should make up your mind to find a better, more responsible hosting service.
Consistent Downtime.
A second prominent problem is repetitious downtime. It’s normal for all hosting companies to have downtime now and then for server maintenance. With the top hosting company, such downtime usually occurs for no more than an hour every six months, or even less than that. If your company experiences downtimes of more than an hour every months, then it is a bad host and may justify you switching to a better one. Downtime can hurt your business, or affect your traffic even if your website is non-business. Too much downtime can actually lose you a lot of visitors, especially if they come two or more times to you site only to find out that it’s offline, they may never come back.
To avoid these problems, especially if they are persistent enough to the point where they affect your traffic, then the only solution is to move your site to another host. In another article, I have outlined steps that are required when transferring your site from one hosting company to another.

John Guinn is the Publisher of Complete Hosting Reviews, an online magazine that tests and reviews Web Hosting Companies.
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What Is Cloud Hosting

What Is Cloud Hosting

IT professionals and private consumers of technology alike will no doubt be aware of the term cloud computing. A term and a concept that appears to be consuming everything in its path as the future of the IT industry. The following article looks at one incarnation of the technology that offers great potential for enterprise, that of cloud hosting.
Cloud Computing
The concept of cloud computing is one that manifests itself in many ways and covers a broad array of applications and functions. In its simplest sense it refers to end users accessing computing resources they need from a cloud, i.e., a shared pool of IT resources from a remote location made available through the internet. Cloud services are characterised by the fact that they do not require data to be stored on, software installed on, or configuration and preferences to be set on end users’ devices. Instead users access resources that are maintained and managed in remote centralised locations by a specialist provider. They are therefore free of physical, geographical and technological constraints and can access the same cloud service wherever they are, across any device – mobile, desktop or tablet – as long as they have an internet connection.
The concept can also be thought of, and indeed referred to, as utility computing. The fact that computing resources, be it hardware or software (see below), are available as a service that can be tapped into on-demand rather than requiring local installations, is akin to a household utility. Indeed, a commonly used analogy is that of electricity. Electricity is generated in a series of centralised locations by specialist providers using advanced equipment and techniques (pooled with wider electricity resources) and accessed through the grid in contrast to a system whereby each consumer builds, installs and maintains their own generator, with each having a finite capacity. In cloud computing the internet is analogous to the electricity grid and the user accesses the computing utility rather than build, install and maintain their own computing resources. Therefore, as with centralised electricity production, it delivers economies of scale for the provider, and consequently cost savings for the user, as well as the ability to access what you need, when you need it; providing solutions that are scalable and responsive to demand.
Generally the end user has no involvement (or need to invest) in the installation and maintenance of the hardware and infrastructure underpinning a cloud service, which is all controlled by the third party provider, but they can have input into software installations and configuration depending on which service they sign up for. These cloud services can be broken down into three tiers:
IaaS – Infrastructure as a Service – offers access to physical computing resource, including disk space on virtual servers and networks whilst leaving the installation and configuration of operating systems and software to the client.
PaaS – Platform as a Service – a platform including physical resource and operating systems together with the software (e.g., a solution stack) required to run a particular computing environment.
SaaS – Software as a Service – the user simply has access to applications running on a cloud platform.

Cloud Hosting

Cloud Hosting is a form of cloud computing, more specifically either IaaS or PaaS, whereby the end user can get access to shared physical resources – servers, networks, bandwidth and supporting infrastructure (plus solution stacks on PaaS) – without the need to purchase, rent or install specific hardware themselves. Typically cloud hosting is employed to serve websites but it can support other enterprise functions and networks.

In essence it is a variant of the wider concept of shared hosting but instead of multiple websites, for example, sharing a single physical server (including a software installation), those multiple sites are hosted across a network of shared servers (and computing resources) managed using software partitions.

Cloud Hosting therefore provides scalable on-demand hosting capacity (as the appropriate level of physical resources can be accessed in accordance with demand), where the client doesn’t have to worry about the specifics of hardware installations and need only pay for what they use.

VDC – Under the banner of cloud hosting a VDC, or a Virtual Data Center, is again an IaaS which offers enterprises the opportunity to utilise their own networks of servers from the cloud using servers which are defined by software partitions rather than being physically distinct (although the underlying hardware resource is ultimately located within physical data centers).

Whatever demands a website and a business’s propositions create, there is always a hosting solution to fit the purpose. For many that will be cloud hosting due to its ability to offer cost efficiencies alongside unparalleled flexibility.

 

Cloud Hosting- Still Stumbling Over The Clouds

Cloud Hosting- Still Stumbling Over The Clouds

Cloud computing is just around the corner; some may argue that it’s already here, and it’s been with us for a while (think Google). Although a maturing technology, cloud hosting is still surrounded with a lot of hype. Customers are, in a way, still stumbling over the “clouds”.
Different cloud hosting companies offer different cloud service platforms, built on different cloud computing technologies. What all of these have in common is that they are supposed to not only pose as the latest buzzword in a marketing message, but offer a better solution to the customer’s hosting needs. So, what are the benefits of cloud hosting over the shared or dedicated hosting solutions?
The idea behind the cloud hosting is to charge the customer for the resources that they are actually using, thus allowing for a greater cost control. There is no underutilized bandwidth. A customer is not paying for a fixed amount of server bandwidth in advance, regardless of the amount of traffic he receives, as it was the case in the past. When the hosting is in the cloud, a spike in the server load increases the cost, and a drop decreases the cost.
It’s self-contradictory that this actually makes hosting in the cloud a better solution for bigger websites. While the prices have come down in the last few years, cloud hosting is still out of reach for many small businesses. For now, it is a cheaper and simpler option for websites with heavy traffic because they don’ have to factor in sudden traffic surges, as they would have in the past. When you’re hosting your data in the cloud, a hosting provider is the only one responsible for the server infrastructure.
There is no more server crashing, and downtimes are rarely experienced. In the case that one server goes down, the others continue to work so there is virtually no downtime. The servers in the cloud are using load balancing technologies, and have hardware updates done continuously. The advantages that cloud hosting has to offer can – paradoxically – turn out to also be its biggest vulnerabilities!
Security is still the concern most often expressed by the customers. It was said, over and again, that the data is safely stored on servers housed within the data centers operating security measures. However, the concern about the security of customer’s data when sharing their hardware with other users is legitimate. Besides, where exactly is their data? The customers have lost the control over the physical location of their data which may be unsettling for many.

Cloud Computing Growth Statistics

Cloud Computing Growth Statistics

Looking at the current market stature, anybody can predict the future of cloud services. The beginning days were somewhat filled with dark when people were a bit cautious about its growth and its capabilities. But it seems that now the concept has reached the dawn of the day. A major part of the user group is considering it usable for short as well as for long run. It has been significantly effective in handling large set of operations that people doubted earlier. Techno gurus have even suggested that the stage is set for it and it will be the leader in providing every kind of hosting and internet services in the future.
Based on recent cloud computing reviews, it was recorded that the overall market share of cloud computing companies in India is 100 million dollars now and by 2015, it is estimated to cross the 1 billion dollar mark. Well the current growth record at least proves one thing for sure that the saturation of this service is nowhere near. The record above clearly suggests the rate at which it has been growing which is actually quite impressive. Such reviews have never been found with other computer services. This proves one more point that it is equally competitive to its competitors in terms of performance and quality.
The providers are also not behind in providing excellent services to their qualities. They are hiring skilled professionals and system administrators that can control the overall infrastructure unlike any other company or group. They are making every possible attempt to make their services the best in the industry such that every road leads to nowhere but clouds. Creatively talented administrators are creating firewall systems that are invincible. Every small feature is reviewed and molded to perform to their best in the level of their category. Not only are the providers concentrating on improving just their own part but is also focusing on enhancing the client’s side too so that the business keeps going on successfully on both sides.
Many IT heavyweights such as Google, Dell, Hewlett Packard, etc are openly using these services. Most of the industry biggies are also shifting their mode of operations to it on a permanent basis. May be they are getting this confidence by seeing the IT giants. If they are using it without any difficulty, how easier will it be for others? The rate of cloud computing growth since they were incepted by the IT biggies has been breathtakingly higher.
All in all, it’s good news for cloud providers. The growth statistic is an increasing graph. The features are optimized and complete for anybody whether he is an individual or a multinational company. The growth has been very quick and there has been a launch of all different wave of clientele. What else can be said is, the future is uncertain. What will happen is in nobody’s control and we make our predictions based on our current marks and so basing on present case scenario, it can be said that cloud services is having a very bright future.